All you need to know about Refractory, the simple guide to refractory and refractory materials. The definition, types and typical applications
Chrome flour (also known as iron chromite, chromite powder, chrome flour 325, and chromite flour) is an inorganic compound that is used as a pigment.
Crucial to the identity of the refractory material itself is how it performs in elevated temperatures - but this isn’t the only area where a refractory needs to excel. Certain applications require elevated levels of compressive strength and specific porosity profiles.
Charcoal briquettes are the economical choice when it comes to domestic solid fuel - and are desirable from a manufacturing point of view too.
Not all refractories are created equal: the acidic, basic and neutral classifications help the user in their choice of optimal refractory material.
Foundry burn on is a name given to a wide variety of surface defects that are produced at high heat during the metal sand casting process. Carbonaceous materials in the mold, such as high-anthracite coal dust can prevent such defects from forming.
Bentonite is a form of clay that has found numerous uses over its thousands of years of use - but perhaps most notably in foundries from the 1900’s onwards, alongside powdered coal.
Chrome sand is used in high-quality castables for producing precision castings when held together using organic resin- or inorganic type- binders.
Anthracite is one of the hardest forms of coal and is known for its high carbon content. Aside from as a fuel, anthracite finds use in high temperature applications - especially when calcined - due to its relatively high resistance to thermal shock, strength and chemical inertness.
Glass powder isn’t just good for making new glass - it also has applications in the furnaces used to make glass and beyond.